Pauca Verba is Latin for A Few Words.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

Intercessions ~ Third Sunday of Easter




We pray for Pope Francis as he prepares to release his encyclical on the global climate./ Already bitter voices are raised against him and what he might say to us./ For the rediscovery of docility in our often fearful and angry world./ We pray to the Lord.

We pray for the nations of the world and for those in government who propose to lead./ We pray for those in every society who are forgotten, of no importance,/ unsupported,/ unprotected./ We pray to the Lord.

There are presently many wars are being fought around the world,/ all of which impact terribly on children./ We pray for them: children who are refugees,/ wounded,/ fearful,/ out of school,/ damaged emotionally./ We pray to the Lord.

As human persons/ existing alongside angels,/ We ask that our worship would be authentic,/ heart-felt and free./ We pray to the Lord.

In the Easter time we pray for unity in the Church/ that we would keep our hearts fixed on Jesus-Risen/ asking to know how we might serve him truly./ We pray to the Lord.

In the Springtime of our hemisphere/ we pray for those who have no experience of joy:/ for families trapped in argument and violence,/ for the elderly who are forgotten,/ for those who are active in addictions,/ for those who suffer chronic pain or sickness./ We pray to the Lord.

And finally we pray at Easter/ for those who have died to know the joy of being greeted by the bright face of the Resurrected Jesus./ We pray to the Lord.


8 comments:

  1. Thank you Father for these reflections each week. It is evident that you take these thoughts from within your heart and empty it to us. I am grateful for the addition of Pauca Verba to my prayer life as I have grown to be more reflective of myself and those in need around me. It is something I can think about as I go about my daily activities.

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    1. I echo these sentiments. Father Morris has transformed the way I offer my prayers. I am forever grateful.

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  2. I take to heart your encouragement for our "worship to be authentic." In so many instances, I feel that my prayer becomes too comfortable and I am not thinking so much about what I am praying for but rather I find myself just saying the words without embracing them.

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  3. Oh yes, and I sense this quite deeply at Mass when the responses are very weak and so many people won't even pick up the hymnal and there is a great distracted energy. We need help from heaven to start changing this. If we only knew what we were doing. I wonder if many people know that we are worshiping God?

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    1. How shall we think of things to keep it fresh? I would ever so much like to feel inspired and excited when I go to Mass. It is my own shortcoming that keep me from this, I know, but how do I get that awe back? I no longer want to be that person who just sits in the pew giving wrote response to the priest's words. What can I do to bring back the energy. Maybe if I can do this, I can help others also.

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    2. I figure I've offered Mass over 12,000 times. YIKES. And this sense of authentic worship doesn't just happen because one is a priest - especially when a particular Mass is the second or even third of any given day. It requires a great honesty: Where am I? Do I want to be here? What did I just read? Do I really believe in this? Do I mean what I"m saying? These are real questions? And I'm the priest! It must be even more difficult to be in the pew and it's clear the priest is on auto-pilot: "BodyaChrist, BodyaChrist, BodyaChrist. It takes some real discipline to pull my mind back when I realize I've drifted off.

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  4. There is so much to distract us from prayer these days and oh how we need it in our everyday struggles. Thank you for continuing to remind us everyday to pray.

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  5. Good question, Father Stephen. Worship can become lukewarm and careless. I was reading from "The Imitation Of Christ" last night, and was inspired by the words of Thomas a Kempis. "There is never any lessening of the love Christ has for us, never a running dry of the stream of His pitiful intercession on our behalf. What you ought to do then, is to prepare yourself each time for this Sacrament by thinking of it afresh, by pondering with careful consideration the great mystery of salvation. Whenever you say Mass or hear it, it ought to seem to you as great, as unexpected and as joyful a thing as if that same day Christ had first come down into the Virgin's womb and became man; as if He were hanging on the cross, suffering and dying for the salvation of men." If we take these words to heart, our worship be genuine... and real! Yes, Father Stephen.... heaven, help us!

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